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{Hotels} What is the proper tip amount to give maids?

H

Hucc

Guest
#2
A dollar or two a night is sufficient.

If it's a one night stay, you may want to put $2.00.

JMHO
 
G

Glam

Guest
#3
I agree with the Huccster! I usually leave $2.00 after I have cleaned up the place, more if she brings extra towels and remembers how much conditioner I need! (If I forget my own) I used to work in a hotel and the maids there considered it good luck to find two pennies with their tip, not one but two! No one knew why, it was once explained to me, that two pennies meant the person really thought you did a good job! This is of course with a couple bills. It's a yucky job, I think, especially if there are jacuzzis in the room, so I often leave more than I probably should, guilt trip!
 
P

PeabodyNVL

Guest
#4
For me, it depends how many people are in the room. When I go to Vegas for 5 nights, I normally leave $20 for two people ($2 per day per person).

Pea
 
M

MARIPOSA

Guest
#5
My hubby travels a lot and he told me to tip $5 a night when I went on my cruise trip. Wonder if he is extra messy? LOL

Mariposa
 
P

paulfredo

Guest
#7
Sorry, this is another effort of the hotels to help us subsidise wages without actually having to increase the prices advertised. I don't do it, and won't do it, and call me cheap or whatever... it's not what Tipping is supposed to be about.

I tip only when I receive services above and beyond the norm.

Do I tip on the cruise... YEP! I recognize it as a "cost of the cruise" that the lines have successfully transfered to us without increasing the listed prices. I'm going to resist it as long as possible in the hotel industry.

Thanks for letting me vent.

paul
 
B

BurBunny

Guest
#9
No tip is necessary for a one-night stay. However, if your stay is multiple nights, while the custom was to tip at the end of the stay, because you may have a different maid that day, I recommend tipping as you go along. You *do* get better service that way ;)
 
T

tinker

Guest
#10
I go to the bank and get $2 bills. They seem to go over really well in Vegas. I use them for room service on the ship to. It seems everyone likes getting them. Sometimes it takes me up to 10 banks to find enough though. They are really getting scarce.
 
G

Glam

Guest
#11
I respectfully disagree, Paul, these women and men do a back-breaking job and a little cash on the night table is the least I can do. If you agree that tipping is deserved on a ship, why not in the hotel? I don't get the different standard. Also in restaurants, that line has been used by non-tippers even back when I was a waitress. I believe in tipping for doing a service to me, one that I enjoy and am always willing to spend a little extra to get it. Of course that's why us ex-waitresses usually make the best tippers! :lol
 
M

mainecruiser

Guest
#12
Having formerly been in the hospitality business for 16 years, we've found that our cleaning staff usually received, on average, $3.00 per day. Since we were a destination resort area motel, our clientele was different than most, because couples/families stayed from 3 - 10 days. Our staff was well paid, but the extra income kept them loyal to our business.
 
D

DeniseZ

Guest
#13
I agree with Paul on this one. There is a difference between restaurant wait staff and cleaning staff at hotels and the same services aboard ship in respect to their salary structure. Hotel cleaning staff receive a regular salary, be it minimum wage or something higher depending on the area and class of the hotel. U. S. restaurant wait staff get about $2.19 an hour and they pay income taxes on that amount PLUS 8 - 10% of their sales. Uncle Sam recognizes the fact that waiters/waitresses tips are part of the salary structure and wants to make sure he gets his cut. We all know that cruise line steward and wait staff salary structure depends on the tips. It’s a given fact and the cruise line makes us all aware of it by pushing the recommended tip amounts. Is it nice to leave a tip for land based hotel staff, sure! But I don’t believe it is mandatory. Sometimes I do (when I have had great service or requested extra services or during extended stays) and other times I don’t So, call me cheap. I don’t tip the checker at WalMart or the grocery store either.

This brings up a timely thought. I am having a new refrigerator delivered tomorrow. And I paid $65.00 for Lowes to bring it 3 miles. I have heard from friends in the north(NY in particular) that it is the practice in those areas to tip these guys too. Any thoughts on that one? It’s not my practice to tip delivery people when I have paid for that service.
 
G

Glam

Guest
#14
Yeah, but Denise, their regular salary is not much more! Like $6.00! I guess I don't tip so much because of the salary or whatnot, I tip because I think it's a hard job, one I would hate! I guess some people like to clean, not me! :lol
 
D

DeniseZ

Guest
#15
Who tips the counter help at McDonalds? We all know they only make a tad over minimum wage but tipping isn't "the norm" there. Or what about those flipping the burgers in the back? Or the dishwashers and food prep help in the restaurants, those that iron your shirts at the dry cleaners? There are any number of jobs in the service industry where workers earn salaries within the minimum wage rate or within the poverty level. Yet do we tip all of them?



Post Edited (05-02-03 15:16)
 
C

Chippsetter

Guest
#16
The other thing is that Uncle Sam assumes you made a certain amount in tips so you have to pay as if you did or work real hard to convince them that you didn't
 
G

Glam

Guest
#17
Well, I dunno, the kids at McDonalds have other perks, like getting zits. :lol I guess I feel it's different, it's more involved cleaning someone's room than flipping someone's burger. I was a manager at a hotel at the airport. I became close to these women and saw them sweat. I saw the bunions on their feet, the callouses on their hands and all the back problems they incurred from lifting laundry that weighed tons. I saw them hurry to get a room finished for a guest who wanted early checkin. I saw them turn in valuables and I grew to admire them. Maybe that is why I feel so strongly about it. As I said, I probably overtip and have always even tipped for carry-out service even thought the waitress didn't wait on me but only took my order and packed my food. I also tip at coffee joints. I tip every time someone brings me room service on the cruise. I tip people because they have done something I was too lazy to do for myself. I tip the mailman at Christmas, I tip the paperboy. Jeez, if I stopped all this tipping, maybe I could go on more cruises! But I can't change, I enjoy it.

Weirdest thing: the first time I went to Ireland, I read in Fodor's Guide not to tip, so I never tipped anyone! It felt really WEIRD, :lol The next trip, I sat at a pub and saw all these Americans tipping. Jeez, my mom even tipped this guy on a tractor who escorted them on his tractor to the post office! She tipped this little old nun who let us peek in the closed church in Navin. She tipped the guys in the band as well, maybe that's where I get it! So, I said to my mom, all smug and superior, "Mom, you don't tip here, it's not normal." The bartender overheard me and said, "Well, that used to be true, miss, but since all you Americans started to come here, we're kinda getting used to it!" Imagine my horror, thinking all those people I never tipped thought of me as "that cheap American." :lol
 
L

Lady Jag

Guest
#18
Have to agree with Paul and Denise on this one. I never even thought of tipping in hotels!! The only time I've tipped is if the maid has performed some extra service and then we tip about $5 for whatever it is we requested.

Cruising is a different story altogether and we gladly tip well above the suggested amounts if the service was excellent and usually it is. Even though my husband is in the service industry and we really reward good service, the thought of tipping in a hotel just never really dawned on me. :dizzy
 
C

CruiseDiva

Guest
#19
When I worked at McDonald's HQ in Chicago, the counter employees were not allowed to accept tips. If they did, they'd be discharged.

My husband Mel has traveled on business for more than thirty years and I asked him about tipping hotel maids. His response..."What are you talking about?" I honestly never heard of tipping them until I traveled with a friend who is a former airline flight attendant.

I worked for Holiday Inn at Disneyland one summer and the maids got paid a lot more than the waitresses. I know they perform tough jobs because I was a waitress and have watched the maids at work. The "easiest" job is cocktail waitress (except on your feet) and, oddly enough, that's the one that garners the biggest tips.

I dunno how I feel about tipping the maids... if we stay someplace more than one night, I usually do. But I have to do it on the sly because Mel doesn't think it's necessary.

Denise, I'd say there's no need to tip the delivery guy if you paid for delivery! When we've moved cross-country, we have tipped the moving guys, though.
 
M

MARIPOSA

Guest
#20
After reading the above replies it seems that those of us who count on tips for grocery money tend to tip routinely for ANY services we receive. One friend even tips the guy in the restaurant who brings him continuous refills on coffee. It seems that if someone frequents the same restaurants or hotels often, they might tip more regularly and those staff really look forward to serving them. 'Give a little, get a lot ' is what service oriented folks say that I know.

Another little 'tip' here, when you contract out for some services the 'gratuity' is included in the bill. I know for a fact that under those circumstances that the worker does not always receive that tip, but the owner or scheduler pockets it. How sad. I always hand my tips to the worker personally.

Mariposa



Post Edited (05-02-03 19:18)