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OT:BeckieP. got me wondering...

B

Beth & John

Guest
#1
Hey BeckieP......You got me wondering about how the jury selection process is done in other places.

I think our county used to select jurors from people who had voted. They found it wasn't necessarily the fairest way to do this & I think they were running out of people to select. I now believe they select from the driving license registrations. Not sure how they work it but it still doesn't seem fair. My families last name begins with an H......right in the middle of the alphabet......and someone is always being called for jury duty. Wonder if that has anything to do with it?! Hmmm.....

Fortunately for us.....we can call, write a letter & send it to the county asking to be rescheduled for another week. Also....once I received a "Get out of Jury Duty for 1 year" card from one of the judges. Had never heard of that one before....but I liked it. LOL

Any thoughts on this subject?

Beth
 
A

anton

Guest
#2
Y'oughta try jury selection in Tennessee. If you pay taxes, or even renew your dog's rabies vaccination, you're on the rolls.
I was on one jury panel (2nd degree murder: multiple hits to the head with a shovel) where the defense lawyer tossed the entire panel. Didn't faze the judge; he told the defense that two could play that game. He then directed the bailiff to grab any citizen in the courthouse paying their taxes or renewing their driver's license. He then expanded it to include citizens on the streets in the vicinity of the courthouse. The bailiff came back inside of 20 minutes with a full courtroom of VERY irritated prospective jurors, at which point the judge informed them exactly why they were there and, more importantly, who caused it.
Fastest murder trial I've ever seen.

anton
 
S

sail7seas

Guest
#3
In Massachusetts, ALMOST nobody is exempt from serving on jury duty.

Judges, attorneys, neurosurgeons etc. all must appear if summoned. Whether or not they are actually selected to hear a particular trial is another story. I believe that citizens over the age of 70 can serve but do not have to.

Our system involves you being assigned a set day to appear. You will only have to be there for one day or the length of one trial if you are seated. Most jury trials do not last more than three days. Of course, there are some that go longer...even months. Once you have appeared for your assigned day, whether chosen for a trial or not, you are exempt from service for the next three years.

If the day you are assigned raises a problem for you, you are allowed to select a business day within the next 365 days to appear....and you better be there on that date.

I think the names are taken from the voter registation lists of every city and town in the state. If you are not a registered voter for the purpose of avoiding jury duty, how sad you have given up our greatest right....to vote!!
 
R

Rebekah

Guest
#4
I havent been called for jury duty since 1988 in Florida. Actually, I wish they would call me, I love that stuff.
 
B

Beckiep

Guest
#5
CT is very similar to MA, from the sounds of it. One day unless you're selected for a trial. Most prospective jururs are put on stand by and you call the night before. If jury selection is canceled, you're off the lists for a year (supposedly. They may call you, but you don't have to go.) If you have to go in like hubby did, you're off for a yr. min. If you're voi dier'ed (questioned) you get like 2 yrs off. If you're selected, you get off for three years. Hubby served and was called within the three year time frame. Sent back the initial questionaire and he was excused.
If not selected, your duty is served in one day. If you're selected, you serve till the end (in hubby's case, it was a week.)
You can REQUEST to move your date. They will decide whether or not you can (if you're reason is good enough and vacation is not good enough.), and when you will be moved to within 1 yr.
As for where they get the list, it's derived from various sources---DMV (registrations, license, etc.), property tax records and voter registration. However, a while back there was a problem with our district. Everyone in the district was marked "D" for deceased and no one was called. That was corrected and for a while, we were the only ones being called I think to make up for it. It seems odd though that my husband has been called four times in 3 yrs. while my aunt who lives around the corner and her family (all adults living in the house) have never ever been called.
They've also now redistricted, which is good for us. Last time, hubby served it was in Hartford court. A pain to drive and just a horrible place in a bad location. His sister-in-law had to go to Enfield, on the MA border from Bristol (where ESPN is. Further south than we are.)--an hour drive in good conditions nevermind rush hours. Anyway, with the new redistricting, we (including S-I-L) can only be called in Bristol or New Britain courts. No more than 20 mins. away. NB is a new courthouse, which is where hubby served. He said it was gorgeous! Refrigerator and microwave in the jury room. Pay phone and you could use cells. Snack bar. movies running on a big screen TV and a larger reg. TV with cable.
If you're over 70, you can refuse. If you are an elected official, judge, lawyer, etc. you can refuse. Doctors can request to be relieved, but may or may not be granted, from what I understand.
You are paid for the day, either by your co. (it's illegal for them not to pay you) or by the state (unemployed, self-employed etc.)
 
L

Lisa

Guest
#6
Here in my county (Milwaukee) in Wisconsin - the pool consists of all licensed drivers. There are two categories of jurors - regular and standby. Regular jurors have to show up for two days in a row and wait in a room until there number is called and then you are put in a pool for a trial. If you are a standby juror - you have to call at noon and after 5:00pm on the days noted on your summons - if you are needed there will be a message that you have to report that afternoon or the next day. After two days if you are not selected for a jury you are released. I got a little ticked off the one time I was on jury duty - I was in the regular category and I sat there for two days and never got called, but they called in the standby's every day and they were all called for a pool! At least it was two days off of work - but the facilities could have been better!