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OT - For a slow Friday night...ship trivia

Discussion in 'Know Before You Go' started by Nessie, Jan 3, 2003.

  1. Bruce

    Bruce Guest

    Go Ahead.... somebody say cunard. You know she is just waiting.

    Bruce
     
  2. ShipMaven

    ShipMaven Guest

    At your service, Bruce.

    CUNARD

    Vessel Years in Service Tons
    Abyssinia 1870 - sold to J.& G Thomson (shipbuilders) in part exchange for new ship, resold to Guion Line 3,376
    Acadia 1840 - 1849 sold to North German Federation navy, renamed Erzherzog Johann. 1,154
    Africa 1850 - 1868 sold. 2,226
    Alaunia (first) 1913 - 1916 mined and sunk, 2 lives lost. 13,405
    Alaunia (second) 1925 - 1944 sold to Admiralty as repair ship HMS Alaunia. 14,040
    Albania
    (formerly Consuelo, formerly Cainrona) 1911 - 1912 taken over with Thomson Line and in 1912 sold to Andrew Weir's Bank Line, renamed Poleric. 7,640
    Albania (second) 1921 - 1930 sold to Italy, renamed California. 12,768
    Aleppo 1865 - 1909 scrapped. 2,057
    Aleria 1870 - 1882 sold to Red Star Line renamed Pennland 3,428
    Alpha 1863 - 1869 sold to Pickford & Black, Glasgow. Used on Halifax-New York-Bermuda feeder service. 653
    Alps 1852 - 1855 transferred to British & Foreign SN Co. In 1859 sold to West Indies & Pacific SN Co, Liverpool. 1,440
    Alsatia (first) 1923 - 1933 sold to France, renamed Ingenieur Cachin. It was used as a tender at Cherbourg. 1,310
    Alsatia (second)
    (formerly Silverplane [12 passenger]) 1951 - 1963 sold to Taiwan, renamed Union Freedom. Purchased from Silver Line in 1951 and used for cargo only. 7,226
    America 1848 - 1866 reduced to cargo only, became sailing ship and renamed Coalgacondor. Scrapped 1877. 1,826
    Andania (first) 1913 - 1918 torpedoed and sunk, 7 lives lost. 13,405
    Andania (second) 1922 - 1940 torpedoed and sunk while being used as an Armed Merchant Cruiser. 13,950
    Andes 1852 - 1855 transferred to British & Foreign Steam Nav. Co. Sold to Spanish Gov't in 1859 and renamed Lagos. 1,440
    Andria
    (formerly Silverbriar [12 passengers]) 1952 - 1963 sold to Taiwan, renamed Union Faith. Purchased from Silver Line in 1952 and used for cargo only. 7,228
    Antonia 1922 - 1942 sold to Admiralty for conversion to fleet repair ship renamed HMS Wayland. 13,867
    Aquitania 1914 - 1950 scrapped. 45,647
    Arabia (first) sold to Royal Mail Steam Packet Co while building, renamed La Plata.
    Arabia (second) 1853 - 1868 wrecked. Laid down as Persia (first) but launched as Arabia. Converted to sail 1864. 2,402
    Arabia (third) 1948 - 1963 sold to Liberia renamed Onshun. 8,720
    Ascania (second) 1925 - 1957 scrapped. 14,013
    Ascania (first)
    (formerly Gerona) 1911 - 1918 wrecked, no lives lost. Taken over with Thomson Line. 9,111
    Asia (first) 1850 - 1867 sold to Robb & Co, Glasgow and converted to sail. 2,226
    Asia (second) 1947 - 1963 sold to Taiwan, renamed Shirley. 8,723
    Assyria 1950 - 1963 sold to Liberia renamed Laertis. 8,683
    Athenia 1923 - 1939 chartered from Anchor-Donaldson Line for Cunard & Anchor-Donaldson Joint service - 1922-1939. Torpedoed and sunk on first day of WWII, 128 lives lost. 13,465
    Aurania (first) 1883 - 1905 scrapped. 7,269
    Aurania (second) 1917 - trooping duties only, 1918 torpedoed and sunk, 9 lives lost. 13,936
    Aurania (third) 1924 - 1942 sold to Admiralty as fleet repair ship renamed HMS Artifex 13,984
    Ausonia (first)
    (formerly Tortona) 1911 - 1918 torpedoed and sunk by gunfire, 44 lives lost. Taken over with Thomson Line. 7,907
    Ausonia (second) 1922 - 1942 sold to Admiralty as fleet repair ship HMS Ausonia. 13,912
    Australasian 1859 - 1877 sold to Telegraph Construction & Maintenance Co converted to cable ship. In 1859 purchased from European & Australian Royal Mail Co, rebuilt in 1869 and renamed Calabria. 2,902
    Balbec 1853 - - 1884 holed, beached and written off as total loss. Launched as Baalbek but completed as Balbec, mostly Mediterranean service. 774
    Batavia 1870 - 1884 sold to John Elder (shipbuilders) in part exchange for new ship, ran for Canadian Pacific 1887-1891. 2,553
    Beta 1873 - 1889 sold to Halifax & West India SS Co. Halifax-Boston, New York-Bermuda feeder services. 1,070
    Bothnia (first) 1874 - 1898 sold and scrapped. 4,535
    Brescia (first) 1903 - 1931 scrapped. Mediterranean service, 1929 laid up. 3,255
    Brest 1874 - 1879 wrecked in fog. Liverpool - France feeder service. 1,472
    Britannia 1840 1,156 tons, sold 1849 to North German Federation Navy renamed Barbarossa 1,156
    Britannic 1934 - 1960 scrapped. Was an ex-White Star Line, became Cunard-White Star Line 1934. 26,943
    British Queen 1852 - France and Mediterranean trade, 1862-1863 used on New York-Nassau-Havana feeder service, scrapped 1899. 772
    Caledonia 1840 - 1850 sold to Spanish Navy. 1,156
    Cambria 1845 - 1860 sold to Italy. 1,423
    Cameronia 1921 - 1924 chartered from Anchor Line. 16,365
    Campania 1893 - 1914 converted to aircraft carrier, 1918 sunk in collision. 12,950
    Canada 1848 - 1867 sold to Portugal; became sailing ship Mississippi. 1,831
    Carinthia (first) 1895 - 1900 wrecked, no lives lost. 5,598
    Carinthia (second) 1925 - 1940 torpedoed and sunk, 4 lives lost. 20,277
    Carinthia (third) 1955 - 1968 sold Sitmar Line renamed Fairland. 21,947
    Carmania (first) 1905 - 1932 scrapped. 19,524
    Caronia (first) 1905 - 1932 sold Japan renamed Taiseiyo Maru, 1933 scrapped. 19,687
    Caronia (second) 1949 - 1968 sold to Panama renamed Columbia. 34,362
    Carpathia 1902 - 1918 torpedoed and sunk, 5 lives lost. 13,603
    Cassandra 1922 - 1924 chartered from Donaldson Line 8,135
    Catalonia 1881 - 1901 scrapped. 4,841
    Cephalonia 1882 - 1900 sold to Chinese Eastern Railway renamed Hailor. 5,517
    Cherbourg 1875 - 1909 scrapped. France & Mediterranean trade. 1,614
    China 1862 - 1880 sold to Spain renamed Magallanes. 2,638
    Columbia 1841 - July 1843 wrecked, no lives lost. 1,175
    Corsica 1863 - 1868 sold Royal Mail SP Co. Mediterranean service. 1,134
    Cuba 1864 - 1876 sold to D.Brown converted to sailing ship Earl of Beaconsfield. 2,832
    Cunard Adventurer 1971 - 1977 sold to Lauritz Kloster, Oslo renamed Sunward II. 14,151
    Cunard Princess 1977 - 1989 still in service. 17,495
    Cunard Countess 1975 - 1989 still in service. 17,495
    Cunard Ambassador 1972 - 1974 damaged by fire at sea, sold to C.Clausen, Copenhagen and rebuilt as livestock carrier Linda Clausen. 14,151
    Cypria 1898 - 1928 scrapped (cargo ship) 2,936
    Damascus 1856 - 1861 exchanged with P.Denny in part payment for new ship, subsequently went to Allan Line 1,213
    Delta 1853 - 1860 sold to Halifax ownership. Halifax-New York-Bermuda service. 645
    Demarara 1872 - 1887 disappeared at sea. Mediterranean and West Indies services, 1880 became cargo only. 1,904
    Emeu 1854 - 1859 sold P&O Line. Purchased from Australasian Pacific Mail SS Co, 1859 1,538
    Emperor of India
    (formerly Kaiser-I-Hind) 1921 - chartered from P&O Line (qv) - 1 voyage 1921. 11,430
    Empress of India
    (formerly Prinz Friedrich WilhelmI) 1921 - chartered from Canadian Pacific (qv) - 2 voyages 1921. 16,992
    England 1982 - (purchased from DFDS), 1986 left for Jeddah as accommodation ship renamed America XIII. 8,116
    Etna 1854 - 1860 sold Inman Line 2,215
    Etruria 1885 - 1909 scrapped. 7,718
    Europa 1848 - 1867 sold and became sailing bark. 1,834
    Feltria
    (formerly Avoca, formerly Uranium) 1916 - 1917 - torpedoed and sunk, 45 lives lost. Purchased from Uranium Line. 5,254
    Flavia
    (formerly British Empire, formerly Campania, formerly Campanello) 1917 - 1918 torpedoed and sunk, 1 life lost. Purchased from Uranium Line. 9,285
    Folia
    (formerly Principe Di Piemonte, formerly Principello) 1916 - purchased from Uranium Line, 1917 torpedoed and sunk, 7 lives lost. 6,560
    Franconia (first) 1911 - 1916 torpedoed and sunk while trooping, 12 lives lost. 18,150
    Franconia (second) 1923 - 1856 scrapped. 20,158
    Gallia 1879 - 1896 chartered to Cia Trasatlantica and renamed Don Alvaro De Bazan, reverted to Gallia same year, 1897 sold to Beaver Line. 4,809
    Georgic 1934 - 1956 scrapped. Was an ex-White Star Line, became Cunard White Star Line 1934. 27,759
    Hecla 1860 - 1871 rebuilt to 2,421 tons, sold to Laird Bros (shipbuilders) in part payment for new ship. 1,790
    Hibernia 1843 - 1850 sold to Spanish Navy; renamed Habanois. 1,422
    Imperator 1920 - 1921 (ex-Hamburg America Line war reparations ship), chartered by Cunard for 9 voyages 1920-1921, 1921 purchased and renamed Berengaria,1938 damaged by fire and sold for scrapping, 1946 scrapped. 52,226
    Italian 1856 - chartered from Lamont & McLarty, Liverpool for Mediterranean routes. 784
    Ivernia (first) 1900 - 1917 torpedoed and sunk while trooping, 121 lives lost. 14,058
    Ivernia (second) 1955 - 1963 renamed Franconia (III), 1973 sold to Russia renamed Fedor Shalyapin. 21,717
    Jackal 1853 - 1888 transferred to Liverpool, hulked and scrapped in 1890s. Served as a tug and passenger tender at Glasgow. 185
    Java 1865 - 1878 sold to Red Star Line later renamed Zeeland 2,969
    Jura 1854 - 1861 sold Allan Line 1861 2,241
    Kaiserin Auguste Victoria 1920 - 1921 (ex Hamburg America Line war reparations ship), chartered for 10 voyages 1920-1921. 24,581
    Karnak 1853 - 1855 transferred to British & Foreign SN Co, 1862 wrecked. New York-Nassau-Havana mail/feeder service. 1,116
    Kedar 1860 - 1897 scrapped. 1,783
    Laconia (first) 1912 - 1917 torpedoed and sunk, 12 lives lost. 18,099
    Laconia (second) 1921 - 1942 torpedoed and sunk while carrying Italian prisoners of war, 2,275 lives lost. 19,680
    Laurentic 1934 - 1940 torpedoed and sunk, 49 lives lost. Was an ex-White Star Line, became Cunard-White Star Line 1934. 18,724
    Lebanon 1855 - 1859 sold to Spanish Gov't. Launched 1854 as Aerolith for R. Sloman, Hamburg ,acquired by Cunard 1855. 1,383
    Lettia 1925 - 1939 chartered from Anchor-Donaldson Line for Cunard &Anchor-Donaldson Joint service. 13,475
    Lotharingia 1923 - 1933 sold France, renamed Alexis De Tocqueville. Used as a tender at Cherbourg. 1,256
    Lucania 1893 - 1909 destroyed by fire in Liverpool dock. 12,952
    Lusitania 1907 - 1917 torpedoed and sunk, 1,198 lives lost. 31,550
    Majestic
    (formerly Bismarck) 1934 - 1936 sold to Admiralty as boys'training ship HMS Caledonia. In 1922 it was taken over by White Star Line, became Cunard-White Star Line 1934. 56,621
    Malta 1865 - 1889 wrecked. 2,132
    Marathon 1860 1898 scrapped. In 1873 rebuilt to 2,403 tons. 1,784
    Margaret 1847 - 1856 sold as a cargo ship. Sailed on the Mediterranean service. 700
    Mauretania (first) 1907 - 1935 scrapped. 31,938
    Mauretania (second) 1939 - 1965 scrapped. 35,738
    Media (first) 1947 - 1961 sold to Italy renamed Flavia. 13,345
    Melita 1853 - 1855 transferred to British & Foreign SN Co, 1861 part exchanged with P.Denny (shipbuilders) for new ship. Mediterranean service. 1,254
    Morocco 1861 - 1896 sold. Mediterranean service. 1,855
    Nantes 1874 - 1886 sank in collision. Liverpool-France feeder service. 1,473
    Niagara 1848 - 1866 sold and became sailing ship. 1,834
    Olympic 1934 - 1935-1937 scrapped. Was an ex White Star Line, became Cunard-White Star Line 1934. 46,439
    Olympus 1860 - 1881 sold to J. & G. Thompson (shipbuilders) in part payment for new ship. 1872 rebuilt to 2,415 tons. 1,794
    Orduna 1914 - 1919 chartered from Pacific Steam Navigation Co. 15,499
    Oregon 1883 - 1884 purchased from Guion Line (qv), 1886 sunk in collision, no lives lost. 7,374
    Otter 1880 - water and baggage tender at Liverpool, 1920 sold to R.H.Rea, Liverpool. 287
    Palestine 1858 - 1870 sold to Langlands & Co, Glasgow. 1,800
    Palmyra 1866 - 1897 scrapped. 2,044
    Pannonia 1904 - 1922 scrapped. 9,851
    Parthia (first) 1870 - 1884 sold to John Elder (shipbuilders) in part exchange for new ship, later to Guion Line renamed Victoria 3,167
    Parthia (second) 1948 - 1961 sold to New Zealand Shipping Co renamed Remuera. 13,362
    Pavia (first) 1897 - 1928 scrapped (cargo ship) 2,945
    Pavonia 1882 - 1900 scrapped. 5,588
    Persia (second) 1856 - 1868 sold to J.R.Thompson converted to sail. 3,300
    Queen Mary 1936 - 1967 sold to City of Long Beach, Calif. as museum ship. 80,774
    Queen Elizabeth 1946 - 1968 sold to Elizabeth Corp, Port Everglades renamed Elizabeth, 1970 sold to C.Y.Tung, Hong Kong renamed Sea Wise University, 1972 destroyed by fire at Hong Kong. 83,673
    Queen Elizabeth 2 1969 - still in service. 65,863
    Royal George
    (formerly Heliopolis) Egyptian Mail SS Co, purchased from Canadian Northern SS Co) 1919, 1922 scrapped (known as "Rolling George") 11,146
    Russia 1867 - 1880 sold to Red Star Line renamed Waesland 2,960
    Sagafjord 1983 - purchased from Norwegian-American Cruises, still in service 1989. 24,002
    Samaria (first) 1868 - 1902 scrapped. 2,574
    Samaria (second) 1922 - 1956 scrapped. 19,602
    Saragossa 1874 - 1909 scrapped. Mostly Mediterranean. 2,263
    Satellite (first) 1848 - 1902 sold and scrapped. Served as a passenger tender at Liverpool. 157
    Satellite (second)
    (formerly Mersey Ferry John Herron) 1920 - 1924 purchased from Wallasey Corporation, tender at Cherbourg, scrapped 1924. 333
    Saturnia 1922 - 1924 chartered from Donaldson Line. 8,611
    Saxonia (first) 1900 - 1925 scrapped. 14,281
    Saxonia (second) 1954 - 1963 renamed Carmania (second), 1973 sold to Russia renamed Leonid Sobinov. 21,637
    Scotia 1862 - 1878 sold to Telegraph Construction & Maintenance Co, converted to cable layer. 3,871
    Scythia (first) 1875 - 1899 scrapped. 4,557
    Scythia (second) 1921 - 1958 scrapped. 19,730
    Sea Goddess (first), 1986 - chartered for 12 years with option to buy from Midland Bank. Still in service 1989. 4,253
    Sea Goddess (second) 1986 - (As Sea Goddess (first)) 4,253
    Servia (first) 1881 - 1901 sold and scrapped. 7,392
    Shamrock 1847 - 1854 sold. Served Mediterranean trade. 714
    Siberia 1867 - sold to Spain 1880 renamed Manila. 2,498
    Sidon 1861 - 1885 wrecked. 1,872
    Skirmisher 1884 - tender at Liverpool, withdrawn 1945 and scrapped 1947. (Said to have moved more passengers than any other Cunard vessel!) 612
    Slavonia
    (formerly Yamuna) 1903 - 1909 wrecked, no lives lost. Purchased from British India SN Co. 10,606
    Stratheden 1950 - chartered from P&O Line - 4 voyages 1950. 23,732
    Stromboli 1856 - 1878 lost. Mediterranean & Le Havre service. 734
    Sylvania (first) 1895 - 1910 scrapped. 5,598
    Sylvania (second) 1957 - 1968 sold to Sitmar Line renamed Fairwind. 21,989
    Tarifa 1865 - 1899 scrapped. 2,058
    Taurus 1853 - 1859 sold to Spanish Gov't. 1,126
    Teneriffe 1853 - 1855 transferred to British & Foreign SN Co, 1859 sold to Spain as troop transport. Served Mediterranean trade 1,126
    Transylvania 1914 - 1917 torpedoed and sunk while trooping, 414 lives lost. 14,315
    Trinidad 1872 - 1898 sold to German owners. Mediterranean and West Indies services, 1880 became cargo only. 1,900
    Tripoli 1864 - 1872 wrecked, no lives lost. 2,057
    Tuscania (second) 1926 - 1931 chartered from Anchor Line. 16,991
    Tyria 1897 - 1928 sold to Niger Company renamed Ars. (cargo ship) 2,936
    Tyrrhenia 1922 - 1924 renamed Lancastria, 1940 bombed and sunk while evacuating troops from St Nazaire, about 5,000 lives lost. 16,243
    Ultonia 1898 - 1917 torpedoed and sunk, one life lost. 8,845
    Umbria 1884 - 1910 scrapped. 7,718
    Unicorn 1840 - chartered from G.& J.Burns and used for Halifax-Pictou-Quebec feeder service 1840-1845. 648
    Vandyck 1922 - chartered from Lamport & Holt Line - 1 voyage. 13,233
    Vasari 1919 - 1921 chartered from Lamport & Holt Line - 7 voyages 1919-1921. 10,117
    Vauban 1919 - 1921 chartered from Lamport & Holt Line - 6 voyages 1919-1921. 10,660
    Veria 1899 - 1915 sunk by submarine. Mediterranean service. 3,299
    Vestris 1919 - 1921 chartered from Lamport & Holt Line - 6 voyages 1919-1921. 10,494
    Vistafjord 1983 - (purchased from Norwegian-American Cruises),still in service 1989. 24,292
     
  3. Bruce

    Bruce Guest

    Bows to Maven... in a class by herself.

    Bruce
     
  4. ShipMaven

    ShipMaven Guest

    Ali - there are PLENTY of things I don't know.
     
  5. ShipMaven

    ShipMaven Guest

    Bruce - you mean I can't be classified Animal, Vegetable or Mineral?
     
  6. Bruce

    Bruce Guest

    well, I am not sure how I would classify it. I tend to collect information on things that interest me,,, but this......is a little scary.

    Bruce
     
  7. ShipMaven

    ShipMaven Guest

    As a matter of fact, Bruce, I have a tendency to scare people off. :( Always have. And I'm just a plain, ordinary human being like everyone else...
     
  8. Bruce

    Bruce Guest

    OK,, One last triva type question and I will leave it alone. I am sure you know this Maven. The majority of the survivors from the Titanic were picked up by this ship and a gold medal was struck in their honor. Name the line and the ship.

    Bruce
     
  9. ShipMaven

    ShipMaven Guest

    Are you referring to Cunard's CARPATHIA?
     
  10. Bruce

    Bruce Guest

    Laughing,,,, that's it,,,,,,,,
     
  11. ShipMaven

    ShipMaven Guest

    Well...I might as well a little more trivia to this topic.

    Most of Cunard's traditional ships' names ended in "ia"-- Britannia (their first), Carpathia, Mauretania, Aquitania, etc.. Most of White Star's names ended in "ic"--Olympic, Titanic, etc.

    When Cunard took over White Star, and the company became Cunard White Star, that was an easy way to distinguish which ship originally belonged to which line - until RMS Queen Mary and RMS Queen Elizabeth came along. ;)
     
  12. Bruce

    Bruce Guest

    Do you happen to know why they all ended in "ia".. am just curious I have no idea.

    Bruce
     
  13. ShipMaven

    ShipMaven Guest

    Hmmm...let me go look at what might have been in Samuel Cunard's mind.
     
  14. Bruce

    Bruce Guest

    You have his mind there?

    Bruce
     
  15. Ali

    Ali Guest

    Is she great or what? I just printed out all those posts. Now the next time the question is asked...I'll know the answer. Thanks so much SM!!! And by the way, Kort is doing great. Thank you for asking.
     
  16. ShipMaven

    ShipMaven Guest

    Ali - thank you. I'm delighted that Kortnee is better!

    Bruce - why yes. Samuel and I are contemporaries. I remember that first crossing in 1840 very well - even the cow on board to give fresh milk.

    I haven't found the answer to your question about "ia", but I've got some guesses. Samuel Cunard was born in Nova ScotIA. His first ship sailing from Britain to North America was BritannIA. Most of the ships that followed were named after classic regions or countries such as EtrurIA, CaledonIA (the classic name for Scotland), etc.

    The White Star decision to use names ending in "ic" arose out of their competition with Cunard - they adjectivized names meaning huge, gigantic, etc. to overpower their competition, hence, Titanic, Olympic, Majestic...
     
  17. Bruce

    Bruce Guest

    I shall just sit back and bask in your accumulated knowledge of Cruise ships. I have the autobiography of a former Commodore of the Cunard Line, will try to find it tomorrow and see if he can shed any light on this..

    Bruce
     
  18. Nessie

    Nessie Guest

    OMG, SM I just check back here before bed! Let me guess, all that was from memory???:lol you are the Queen, my hat is off to you! :) :)
     
  19. ShipMaven

    ShipMaven Guest

    Why, of course, that's from memory, Nessie. COUGH. SPUTTER.

    Bruce - which Commodore? Just brought to mind (and this IS from personal knowledge) one Commodore who was given the questionable nickname of "Foggy Morris". Seems that more often than not, the ship's arrival in port was delayed by fog when he was in command. Commodore of the Fleet was in command of my all-time favorite, RMS Queen Elizabeth. And we were, indeed, delayed in lower New York bay several times waiting for the fog to lift. But the Lizzie and Mary had to wait for neap tide in order to maneuver in and out of the harbor - they didn't clear the Hudson riverbed by too much, and thrusters were unknown in those days. They relied on tugs to dock them.
     
  20. Seawall

    Seawall Guest

    SM, leave me off from 76th from the top...... LOL
     

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