• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

Why must RCCL treat us like children


Active Member
The alcohol policy on RCCL is ridiculous. I have some very good expensive champagne I would like to bring to celebrate New Years. Is bringing 2 bottles of wine on board really too much to ask. It works fine for Celebrity.


Community Manager
Staff member
Children don't have money, they can't treat you like a child, it is all about the pocket.

Your mistake was not booking Celebrity :cool:

Just about every other cruise line except NCL has a wine/champagne policy that is acceptable.


Well-Known Member
If you had the alcoholic related problems that Royal Caribbean has had, you would have strict alcoholic related rules also.

Because the passengers have proven, via their actions, that they cannot be responsible, Royal Caribbean has had to control the amount of alcohol that they allow on board.


Well-Known Member
I personally think this is a tough one. Not allowing someone to bring two bottles of champagne on board is fairly severe. On the other hand, if that is allowed it becomes harder to say no to the 24 year old who wants to bring 2 half gallon bottles of vodka. And from there we're back to the folks bringing on six cases of beer.

I think that both previous posters have valid points. There is no doubt in my mind that RCCL's revenue is partially behind the no alcohol from shore policy, but I think it is also very clear that past misbehavior by some is also to blame.

So far as the point that Celebrity still allows limited alcohol to be brought on board, I would venture that the typical passenger on X is probably about 15 years older than his/her RCCL counterpart. That's not to say that an old drunk is preferable to a younger one, but I think it's undeniable that youth spawns more frisky behavior and more alochol induced misbehavior.

Like a lot of things in life, this is a case where a few ruin a good thing for many who are well behaved and do not need to be governed by stern policies.



RCI <b>Tail-Gator</b>
While some of the reason for RCI's policy may be based on past issues, I do believe that it all boils down to the $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$..

Personally, I wish that RCI would allow bar set up in the cabins. It's a shame that they cannot even offer this. They would still be making money.


If you take me serious, it's your problem
I think that in lieu of a shore to ship ban, they should allow a maximum of 2, 1litre bottles of alcoholic beverage containing less than an alcohol content of 17% this would include most wines, and champaignes. This would curtail any issues of alcohol abuse... while also allowing the cruiseline to sell their own alcoholic beverages..


<b>Queen Gator</b>
cruisingator;1356120Personally said:
I totally agree, Gordon. On our recent cruise we were in a grand suite. There was a bar there with an array of champagne glasses, white and red wine glasses, highball glasses, etc. There were at least 6 of each. Why do they even bother? Ordering a bottle of wine or champagne on the ship isn't even going to put a dent into that number of glasses. Guess they're there for effect!

This policy also encourages people to find creative ways to sneak alcohol on board. Funniest one I heard was about some mental giant who filled a Listerine bottle with Jack Daniels. Only problem was that he forgot to wash out the bottle first!!! LOL


If you take me serious, it's your problem
Well, i mean like how prevailent is alcohol abuse on the ships to begin with?? Aside from the college spring breakers, are there really alot of people who abuse alcohol aboard ships??

While i don't think you should be able to bring your own hard liquor on board, i do believe that a couple of bottles of wine or champaigne is acceptable for celebrations in cabin.. Look , if your whole purpose of cruising is to get hammered then i think you have more issues with alcohol than you might think. There are plenty of places aboard a ship to get a drink, and you can even have a bottle delivered to your state room in most cases. Personally, I think that if you consume more than a litre of hard liquor in a 5-7 day cruise then you may be missing out on more things to do onboard. I mean really... are you going to drink so much that you run up more than $200.00 on your sea pass in drinks?? between 5.00 and 7.00 a drink, drinking 5 drinks a day would only be around $130- $170 for the week...

The cruiselines actually keep the drink prices fairly competitive with what i would pay at a club here. I rarely drink more than 4-5 drinks when i'm out, so why would i simply consume more because i was on a cruise? I really fail to see where there is a real problem other than being allowed to bring wine or champaigne onboard for celebratory purposes. For everything else you should support the cruiseline buy drinking from their bars... After all, is that the only reason you go on a cruise?? to drink?? ..... meh.. it's alll lost on me..

Don't get me wrong.. I love my beer, champaigne, and gin&tonics.. and in my youth it wasn't out of the ordinary for me to drink a case(24) of beer in an evening... and on occasion i would drink a 750 of vodka. Gladly as i have grown older i still enjoy an occasional drink or three... but i wouldn't let access to one ruin, or lessen my cruising experiences..


<b>Queen Gator</b>
There are many people who do not like nor drink wine or champagne, so even if it was allowed, they would not bring any on board with them. On the other hand, there are many people who enjoy having a mixed drink while getting dressed for dinner or as a nightcap on their balcony before going to bed. Sure, they can get a drink from one of the bars or have room service deliver a drink, but that's not the point. Back in the old days you could order a bar setup for your cabin or you could buy a bottle on board for in cabin consumption. It was all about convenience. Just because you have it in your cabin does not mean you are not going to be spending money in the bars around the ship. Again I say it's all about convenience.


Active Member
And instead of bringing it onboard (it's a hassle when you have to fly) I wish they would let you purchase a bottle onboard for in room consumption....I don't care what they add to the price, it's the convenience. (Well, if they added $50 to the price, I just wouldn't need that convenience:no:)



Well-Known Member
As I have posted before, I think it is a matter of being discreet. If I pick up a bottle of Appleton or Tortuga in port, I just wrap it in a beach towel and put it in my snorkel bag. I don't wrap it in the towel to conceal it because the x-ray can "see" through a towel. I wrap it to keep it from breaking. I have never had a bottle confiscated when employing this method.

On the other hand folks who bring a few bottles in the brightly colored shopping bags and boxes from the stores in town might as well be waiving a red flag at the "confiscators".